The other day, and I don’t remember why, I googled the name of the farm in Scotland that my great-great-great grandparents had before they emigrated to America in the late 1800s. I didn’t know where it would be, but I hoped I’d recognize a name or something, if I came close. I did. And then I entered the name of the farm (no address) into google maps.

Wow.

Would you believe it puts it right on the site?

I’m pretty sure the confinement barns are new. 🙂 I’m fascinated that a farm in production 200 years ago is STILL in production today, in the same industry (dairy). Obviously things have changed A LOT since then, but do you see the homesite to the left of the big barns? The little lane looks as though it runs through the old-style L-shaped barns that surround the barnyard (like in James Herriot’s Treasury for Children). I can’t be sure, but that’s what it seems like to me.

It gets better though. Or worse, depending on your perspective. :] I’m glad it’s not my farm, in this case:

This street view just blows my mind AND scares the crud out of me, all at the same time. You can turn 360˙ and take in the whole view, and ‘walk’ along the road. When my forebears left this area, they really never expected to see the place, or the people, ever again. And here I can sit in my rocking chair with my computer on my lap and ‘see’ everything. Wow.

Have you traced your family line at all? I’ve absorbed many stories and a lot of information from Gigi, but I need to take the time to sit down and ‘interview’ her. And my husband’s grandparents. I certainly don’t have the time to sit down and really get into the genealogy thing, but you know what? By the time I have the time, the information could be long lost. Take the time today to write down what you know, or call your grandparents and at least get some names, dates, places. Then later, when you have the time, you can do the census research and all that. It can be a fascinating and meaningful exercise. You never know what you’ll discover. 🙂

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